How Fast Do You Have To Swing to Hit a Golf Ball 300 Yards? EXPLAINED!

Written by The Budget Golfer

May 14, 2020

This is a topic which I often see posted on social media, and it is something I often strive for myself. I know on the golf course, I have about zero chance of ever hitting 300 yards consistently. The only time I hit the ball that far is when the wind is perfect, the stars align, and everything just goes right. Even then, I’m scraping 300 yards, including roll.

You then take a look at someone like Rory Mcilroy who’s current average on the PGA Tour is 320 yards, and it really makes you feel like your measly 250 total drive is pathetic.

To be honest, I should find myself lucky. I know even know I would love to consistently drive an extra 50 yards, there are people out there who would love to be able to hit it even as far as I can.

So, what does it take to hit those 300 yard bombs that Rory and the rest of the PGA tour can hit? Let’s dive into the mechanics of what makes up a 300+ yard drive, and look at the required swing speed.

The reality is, no matter how sweetly you hit that ball, and how perfect your swing is – If the swing speed isn’t there, you won’t hit it 300 yards.

how to hit a driver 300 yards

What Swing Speed Do I Need to Hit a 300 Yard Drive?

The answer isn’t simple, as so many variables go into golf in order to create such an impressive result. It also calls into question whether we’re talking 300 yards of carry, or 300 yards of total drive?

There are three key variables which will go into hitting a 300 yard drive:

  1. Club heads speed
  2. Sweet spot contact on the face
  3. A good/well fitted driver for your swing

To sum it up – you’re going to need to swing it damn fast, and hit that ball dead in the centre of the face.

When utilising a Trackman system, it can be calculated that the minimum club head speed, scientifically required to hit a ball 300 yards is 108 mph. This is assuming neutral conditions (ie – no tailwind etc).

For the sake of comparatives, this means that you would require only an 89 mph club head speed in order to reach a 250 yard drive. 89 mph is well within the range of most people I believe.

The trick here is going to be improving your swing speed over time. It is likely that if you’re nowhere near 300 yards, then this is purely going to boil down to a lack of swing speed on your club.

How to Increase your Club Head Speed for a 300 Yard Drive

There is going to be some element of physical limitations here, but let’s look at the core fundementals first.

The easiest thing to do would be to initially look at where you’re hitting the ball on the club face on average. The best way to do this is to buy yourself some contact tape for your club face.

An alternative to contact tape is to use athletes foot spray that you can get in any health shop or pharmacist. If you spray a mist of this on your club face it will leave a white residue which will imprint upon contact with the golf ball. This wipes off relatively easily.

My advice would be to take 10 well thought out drives, concentrating on all your core mechanics, and then note where the contact is on the club face. You will likely find that you tend to favour a certain part of the face Or, if you’re lucky, you’ll hit all 10 shots out the centre of the face. If not, you should focus on getting those central shots, and making them consistent.

Launch angle for a 300 yard drive

The next thing you will need to look at is your launch angle. The average PGA Tour launch angle on a drive is 10.9 degrees. The best way for you to take a look at this accurately is to get yourself hooked up to a Trackman system. Most ranges or golf tutors will be able to provide this, so, next time you have a lesson, take a look at what your launch angle is. If it is really low, or really high, it may be the reason you are not hitting your drive as far as you’d hope.

swing speed for a 300 yard drive

Smash Factor

There is something in golf called a “Smash Factor”. This is essentially the ratio of ball speed to club head speed. So, based on the above 108 mph head speed, you would need a ball speed of 160mph in order to hit the ball 300 yards.

Other Factors

As I said, there are loads of factors which go into hitting a golf ball over 300 yards. But the best thing you can do to figure out why you cannot hit the ball that far is to look at your ball flight.

Are you hitting the ball very low in flight? It is possible you’re not hitting up on the ball enough in order to get the height on your ball that you require to drive it 300 yards. Try putting the ball further forward in your stance, and put a slight tilt on your stance when standing up to take your shot. This will force you to hit ‘up’ on the ball, rather than through or down on the ball.

Perhaps you’re getting massive height? This could be that the loft on your club head is way too high based on your swing type. You should always get fitted for the clubs you have, no matter what your level of playing is. I found that this improved my golf more than anything else.

In order to hit that sweet number 300, you will need to factor everything together to create the ultimate result. You may have the swing speed required to hit the ball that far, but you’re lagging in other area. Or, your swing mechanics might be perfect, but you need to increase your swing speed. Only you will know what you need to do, but I hope this post has helped you on your way to realising what you’re missing in order to hit that elusive 300 Yard Drive!

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